Education

education

How does my oral health affect my life?

Here are a couple of fun ways that great oral health can impact your life.
Confidence when you smile, that translates into better job performance and relationship experiences.
Eating without pain or discomfort or gaps, it’s the simple pleasures in life.
First impressions…your smile and your eyes will be weighed heaviest within first 5 seconds of meeting anyone.
Kissable for your significant other. Your loved ones will appreciate your clean smile and fresh breath!

How can my oral health save my life?

Here are some areas where your oral health can have a significant impact on the rest of your body.

Cardiovascular health

Every day, more than 2,000 people in the U.S. die of heart disease. That’s an average of one death every 39 seconds. Each year around 795,000 people experience a new or recurrent stroke. In 2008, 1 in 9 death certificates in the United States mentioned heart failure.1

Resources :

  1. http://circ.ahajournals.org/content/125/1/e2.full
  2. What does my heart have to do with my mouth?

    Studies have shown that poorly controlled oral gum disease is a risk factor in strokes because of bacteria. Keep reading!

    What happens to the bacteria in your mouth? Do they stay in your mouth?

    Unfortunately no. The bacteria in your mouth enters your blood stream and circulates in your whole body. Studies have shown that people who had a dominance of bacteria that cause gum disease had thicker carotid arteries. That means some bacteria from the mouth that end up in the blood are linked to higher chance of atherosclerosis in the carotid artery, which overtime can cause traffic jam, and if the traffic ever stops, it is a stroke. Heart disease is a complicated issue that involves many factors that includes but not limited to genetic, environmental, and behavioral factors. Bacteria from gum disease (Periodontitis) is only one of many risk factors that has been linked to heart disease. Consult your physician regarding a more complete analysis of your chances of heart disease.

    Resources:

    1. http://circ.ahajournals.org/content/111/5/576.abstract
    2. http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/news/20050207/brush-your-teeth-help-your-heart
    3. https://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/health-topics/topics/atherosclerosis/
    4. http://www.webmd.com/heart-disease/features/periodontal-disease-heart-health

    Diabetes

    According to the American Academy of Periodontology, Diabetic patients are more likely to develop periodontal disease (gum disease) In fact, periodontal disease is often considered a complication of diabetes. Good home and professional dental care as well as good blood glucose control are the best defense against the oral complications of diabetes.

    Resources:

    1. http://www.perio.org/consumer/diabetes.htm
    2. http://www.webmd.com/diabetes/periodontal-disease
    3. http://www.nidcr.nih.gov/OralHealth/Topics/Diabetes/

    Oral Cancer

    Do you smoke, drink alcohol, or ever gotten a tan?

    Oral cancer is the sixth most common cancer, accounting for nearly 5 percent of all cases. More than 43,000 Americans will be diagnosed with oral or pharyngeal cancer this year, resulting in more than 8,000 deaths. That’s one person every hour.
    At Honey Dental, we take oral cancer screening very seriously. You have the option to have an oral cancer screening every time you come in for a cleaning. We use advanced fluorescence visualization to aid in visualization and identification of oral mucosal abnormalities that may elude the naked eye. Advanced scope enhances our ability to catch problems much earlier and more accurately. Check out more details in our “Cool Gadgets” page.

    There are many pathologies that can occur in your mouth, some from bacterial, fungal or viral origin, and some from environmental, hormonal or genetic origin. A good rule of thumb is that once we identity a suspicious lesion, we will take photos and document the lesion and wait about two weeks.  If the lesion persists past two weeks, it may need to be biopsied and evaluated by the lab.  We prefer using laser biopsy versus scalpel biopsy for added comfort during the procedure, less post-op bleeding, less post-op discomfort, less post-op infection, and faster and predictable healing.

    Resources:

    1. http://report.nih.gov/NIHfactsheets/ViewFactSheet.aspx?csid=106
    2. http://www.dentistryiq.com/articles/2012/07/velscope-is-a-non-invasive-oral-cancer-screening-device.html